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2 Steps to Get Your Child Flossing

*See list of future topics at the bottom of this page. Feel free to offer suggestions.

Parents: Do your children actually floss?

When dentists ask this question,
they usually get a dishonest answer.
The truth is, we don’t floss like we should,
and like our dentists tell us to. Children included.
And we don’t do it because we don’t like to do it.
Among adults, 36% would rather
do something unpleasant than floss.
These activities included washing a sink full
of dirty dishes (18%), cleaning the toilet
or waiting in a long checkout line (14%),
and sitting in traffic for an hour or doing their taxes
(9% each). So what can we do, and what can parents
do to ensure their children floss?
It’s not enough to simply decide to floss more, obviously.
There are some ways that we can help our children.
And they are not complicated, either.
Here are two simple steps to get children flossing.

1. The Wake Up Call

There’s a reason we are calling step one
“the wake up call.”
If your children don’t floss (like most of us, apparently),
here’s what you can do: when you they are available,
have them floss really quick. But after they’re finished,
do not throw the floss away!
Instead, have your child smell the floss. More precisely,
smell what was just pulled out from between their teeth.
Perhaps you can take a selfie of their facial reaction, while
you’re at it. How does it smell? Pleasant?
Like roses? Quite the contrary.
It’s foul, to say the least. It might smell like
something died. It’s nasty and gross.
So ask yourself, do you want your child’s mouth to
smell that way? You think it’s a good thing?
Probably not.
That’s why I call this step the “wake up call.”
Because that smell will wake you up, literally.
And because it wakes you up to what is left
in between teeth by not flossing. It’s unpleasant truth.
That’s the first step.
Next, we get practical.

2. Product Placement

If you’re like me, you won’t do something
unless it’s conveniently located.
That’s the whole thing behind remote controls.
Is it such a big deal to walk five feet to the TV?
Apparently, yes. We vote with our feet (literally).
Connect this principle to the discipline of flossing.
Would children be more likely to floss if they didn’t
have to walk to the other end of your home? Probably.
We are more likely to do something simply because it’s
close. This applies to flossing as much as anything else.
So how can you eliminate distance for your children
and make flossing more convenient?
Placement. Place the floss everywhere.
Think about where your kids spend most of their time.
Put floss there!
Some examples:

  • The table where they do homework.
  • Somewhere near the TV or computer.
  • The kitchen.
  • In the car.
  • Their backpack, bag, or purse.

It’s simple, easy access. It’s convenient.
If it’s where they’re at, then they don’t have to
expend extra effort to do it. And there goes
one more excuse for not flossing.
It was right there, in front of them.
You know what they say, “Out of sight, out of mind.”
If your floss is everywhere you are,
then it’s in sight, and on your mind.
This will help your children floss every day.
And hopefully they won’t feel like lying to
the dentist about flossing, anymore.

To be sure you are always current on the most important information regarding your child’s health care, sign up for a free membership, if you have not already. And may you and your child enjoy their beautiful smile, for a lifetime. The world is watching. Thank you for caring.

Future Articles:

  • Ask the Dentist to Explain
  • Who Owns Your Pediatric Dentist?
  • Don’t Lie to the Dentist
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Respiratory Disease
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Heart Disease
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Osteoporosis
  • Mom’s dental disease connection with premature birth

If you have concerns, from how to find a dentist, how to know when to get a second opinion, how dental disease affects your children’s health, please submit a request via comment or email.

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Who Owns Your Pediatric Dentist?

*See list of future topics at the bottom of this page. Feel free to offer suggestions.

As a parent, you want your children to receive
the best dental care.

You expect dentists to do their job responsibly.
To make a proper assessment of your child’s
dental condition, and to decide on proper treatment,
based on facts. You expect dentists to make the choices
that are for your children’s benefit. The dentist is the
health professional, with the training, the education,
the skill. He should make the choices that are best for
the child’s oral health. You expect that the treatments
Your child will receive will be necessary, not merely to
make the dental business money.

The sad fact is, not all dentists are in charge of their
practice. Many Dental Service Organizations (DSO)
are structured in ways to evade regulations and
operate outside the rule of law.
It’s an unfortunate thing. It means that the decisions
dentists make may not be their decision.
It’s who really controls their business.

Despite the dentist appearing to be in control,
there may be a different beneficial owner,
who happens to not be a physician.

Is a non-physician the one really controlling the
dental practice?

Whatever makes more money could very well be
the idea behind everything.

  • Unnecessary dental work.
  • Creative diagnosis.
  • Merely cosmetic dentistry.
  • Expensive treatment that’s solely to generate income.

And children have not been exempt from this abuse.

If your pediatric dentist doesn’t have control
over his own dental practice, then how can you
rest assured that what he’s charging you for
is necessary and for your child’s benefit?

Fortunately, there are laws in place regarding this.
There are prohibitions and restrictions regarding
the ownership and control of a medical practice by someone
who is not a dentist. As there should be. There are laws
requiring that medical care be delivered by clinics that
are owned and under the control of dental professionals.

So if a dental practice is not under the control of a dentist,
there’s something wrong. Not only is it unethical, but it is also
financially harmful to the patients. In addition, the dentist who
is complicit in this illegal arrangement will be held responsible.
It’s a sham business in order to get around the law, for profit.

Even though the dentist may appear to be in charge, he may not be.

To be sure you are always current on the most important information regarding your child’s health care, sign up for a free membership, if you have not already. And may you and your child enjoy their beautiful smile, for a lifetime. The world is watching. Thank you for caring.

Future Articles:

  • 2 Steps to Get Your Child Flossing
  • Ask the Dentist to Explain
  • Don’t Lie to the Dentist
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Respiratory Disease
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Heart Disease
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Osteoporosis
  • Mom’s dental disease connection with premature birth

If you have concerns, from how to find a dentist, how to know when to get a second opinion, how dental disease affects your children’s health, please submit a request via comment or email.

For submitting a suggestion, you’ll receive a free gift.

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Ask the Dentist to Explain

*See list of future topics at the bottom of this page. Feel free to offer suggestions.

Have you ever not understood why your child’s
dentist recommended something?

Do you ever have doubts about his advice?

Have these unanswered issues led you
to disregard what he told you and your child?

In other words, have you not done what the dentist
said, simply because you did not understand it?

It just didn’t make sense to you,
so it couldn’t have been reasonable advice.

Another thing: have you ever thought you know better
for your child’s oral health than your pediatric dentist?

That’s a common temptation, today.

There’s so much information out there, we can all
come to think of ourselves as medical professionals
because we have access to Google.

And then there’s the occasional news article
that comes out, saying that a certain dental habit
actually doesn’t help our children’s oral health.
And because our children weren’t really doing
that thing anyway (but we told our dentist they did),
we immediately agree. Yes, finally, our bias
has been confirmed!

I knew flossing didn’t really help.

But in reality, we just want relief from feeling guilty
for not doing what the dentist said to do.

We think the dentist is wrong, and grab the first bit
of confirming evidence we can. Even when we don’t
outright disagree with our child’s dentists, we don’t get
Half of the stuff they are saying. Why do we have to do
these things?

It doesn’t make sense. Because we don’t get it,
we’re less inclined to do it.

So what’s the answer? What can we do to help ourselves?

There’s actually a very simple solution to this dilemma.

It’s simple: ask for an explanation.

Yes, it can be that easy.

When the dentist recommends something for
your child’s oral health (like flossing), ask why.

Ask for an explanation.

After all, the dentist is the one who has the education
and the training. They are in fact able to back up
what they are saying.

And dentists know that their patients’ understanding
is a big factor. Especially the understanding of parents.
It’s always helpful for anyone to see that
advice is not random, but actually supported.

On the patient side, you and your child will trust your
dentist more, once you hear what they have to say.
Oh, he’s not just telling me this “just because.”
There is actually research and study behind these
things. And hopefully things will start to
make more sense, and it will be easier to follow.
Patient education is key. Ask for it! Take the opportunity to
get more involved in your child’s dental health, and
overall health. If you don’t understand something, ask.
If, for some reason, you doubt the benefits of what your dentist
is recommending, ask her about it.

  • Why is this a good thing?
  • Why does my child need this?
  • What kind of data is behind this?

Especially when there are competing voice about dental habits,
it’s helpful to go to a real professional.

After all, your child’s dental health is that important.

To be sure you are always current on the most important information regarding your child’s health care, sign up for a free membership, if you have not already. And may you and your child enjoy their beautiful smile, for a lifetime. The world is watching. Thank you for caring.

Future Articles:

  • 2 Steps to Get Your Child Flossing
  • Who Owns Your Pediatric Dentist?
  • Don’t Lie to the Dentist
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Respiratory Disease
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Heart Disease
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Osteoporosis
  • Mom’s dental disease connection with premature birth

If you have concerns, from how to find a dentist, how to know when to get a second opinion, how dental disease affects your children’s health, please submit a request via comment or email.

For submitting a suggestion, you’ll receive a free gift.

Share!

Don’t Lie to the Dentist

*See list of future topics at the bottom of this page. Feel free to offer suggestions.

How honest are your children with their dentist?

Statistically speaking, chances are they are
not totally honest. We all have our reasons.
Children can be nervous or shy.
Or embarrassed that they haven’t been maintaining
their dental health as they know they should.
They’ve been told the good dental habits,
but haven’t followed through.
So when asked, they don’t want to admit it.

Flossing

For some reason, flossing always seems to be the easy
example. It reveals something about how patients are
with their dentists.

The American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) has
figured out that 27%, about a third, of adults in the
United States lie to their dentists. When their dentists ask
them about flossing, a third of the adults lie when they answer.
That means a whole third of dental patients
are inhibiting their own dental care!
And that’s not accounting for the children.
We wouldn’t expect a mechanic to effectively fix our car
if we lie about what we did with it.
Nor any other trained expert that needs information
from us, so they can help us effectively.
But that’s 27% of adult dental patients who are getting
in their own way. And that means that one third of dental
patients could develop periodontal disease as bacteria in
plaque below the gumline, which would otherwise
be removed by flossing, causes swelling, irritation,
receding gums, and even tooth loss.

Periodontal disease is also connected with diabetes,
cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis,
Alzheimer’s disease, and cancer.
Once again, oral health impacts overall health.
If that is true of a third of adult patients, it could
also be true of their children.

Yet, all this data hasn’t changed the fact that people
don’t floss like they should, children included.
And worse, they lie about it.

Here’s the catch about lying to the dentist:
she’ll know that it’s lying.

Dentists will be able to see how often children floss
by looking at their mouth (as opposed to listening to it).

Two things will give it away: the plaque build up on
their teeth and by gum inflammation (a.k.a gingivitis,
gum disease). Awkward.

Wouldn’t it be easier to tell the truth?
Then we can just skip the “busted” moment and have
an easier reminder to floss once a day.

Soda

In general, kids love drinking soda. And it turns
out that dental patients lie about drinking a lot of it.
Of course, the best thing would be to cut soda altogether
from your children’s diet.

It is so detrimental to their health, not least of all to
their dental health. There are few things worse than soda
for children’s teeth. It destroys the enamel, leaving
teeth wide open to bacteria.

But, because so many people are addicted to soda,
be sure the dentist will ask your child
about their consumption.

And if the children don’t give an honest answer about
how much soda they drink, again, they will be busted!

The dentist will be able to see the truth, on the teeth.
Apparently, soda leaves a distinctive pattern on teeth.
No matter what you say, the proof is in your mouth.
There’s no hiding the soft drink addiction.

Once again, don’t lie to the dentist.

Alcoholic Beverages

A final topic of dishonesty among dental patients is alcohol.
This would of course apply to adults, and hopefully
not your children!

How much alcohol do you drink?

Why do dentists asks how often you drink?

Because of alcoholic beverages are acidic and can
damage the salivary glands in your mouth.
When you drink a lot of alcohol at a time, and do it often,
it negatively affects your mouth’s production of saliva.
Why is that bad? Saliva keeps helps with bad bread
and decay. And, worst case scenario, heavy drinking
can lead to oral cancer. Not good.

When dentists ask their patients if they drink heavily,
they sometimes get a dishonest answer. And once again,
the dentist will find the truth. They’ll see your dry mouth,
and you’re busted.

Besides honesty being a good thing by itself,
your dentist will be able to tell if you are lying.

How embarrassing is that? Your dentist asks you if you
drink a lot of soda, and you say “no.” But he examines your teeth, and see evidence to the contrary. He asks if you floss, and you say once a day.
But he sees gum disease. Busted! Your dental hygiene will
tell the truth, whether you do or not. When you think about it,
your mouth says “no” but your mouth says “yes.”

Who wants to have that awkward conversation?

Remember that your dentist wants you to be healthy,
and telling the truth will make that easier.

Don’t lie to your dentist!

To be sure you are always current on the most important information regarding your child’s health care, sign up for a free membership, if you have not already. And may you and your child enjoy their beautiful smile, for a lifetime. The world is watching. Thank you for caring.

To be sure you are always current on the most important information regarding your child’s health care, sign up for a free membership, if you have not already. And may you and your child enjoy their beautiful smile, for a lifetime. The world is watching. Thank you for caring.

Future Articles:

  • 2 Steps to Get Your Child Flossing
  • Ask the Dentist to Explain
  • Who Owns Your Pediatric Dentist?
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Respiratory Disease
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Heart Disease
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Osteoporosis
  • Mom’s dental disease connection with premature birth

If you have concerns, from how to find a dentist, how to know when to get a second opinion, how dental disease affects your children’s health, please submit a request via comment or email.

For submitting a suggestion, you’ll receive a free gift.

Share!

Overtreatment

*See list of future topics at the bottom of this page. Feel free to offer suggestions.

Is overtreatment an epidemic?

Imagine this.

You have a 14-month-old girl. You take her to the dentist to get some work done on her teeth. Specifically, you take her to get two cavities filled. But when you arrive, the dentist informs you that your baby girl actually needs four crowns, in addition to the two fillings. “Okay,” you think, “he’s the dentist.” So they take your baby for surgery. They administer anesthesia so they can perform the four root canals. But there are “complications.” She goes into cardiac arrest during the procedure. Two hours later, your 14-month-old girl dies at the hospital. And this was just a dentist appointment.

“No way,” you say. “That must be made-up. It’s too incredible.” As hard and painful as it is to believe, it’s actually happened [citation]. The most difficult part of this story hasn’t even come up yet. Here’s what really takes the cake.

Following this tragedy, guess what the debate is about? Whether your 14-month-old baby girl even needed that dental work in the first place.

Would you have stopped and asked yourself that question? Did she need that procedure?

So, not only have you lost your child, but it’s possible that it was for no legitimate reason, at all.

It’s tragic enough for a child to die. It’s bizarre for a child to die because of surgery at the dentist’s office. But the worst part of it is there’s a question as to whether the procedure itself was necessary.

Imagine that. Suffering the terrible loss. And then, after the fact, asking whether that procedure was even needed in the first place. Was all of it for nothing? Could this terrible situation have been avoided? Was all of this simply because a dentist took advantage of a mother’s trust?

The Biggest Problem

Perhaps the biggest problem in the dental industry is unnecessary dental work. It’s also commonly referred to as “overtreatment.” It’s treatment, of whatever kind, that the dental patient simply does not need.

It’s such a common occurrence that it seems some lawyers could have a special practice in exclusively representing groups of families that have been pressured by pediatric dentists into unnecessary dental work. Not merely hundreds, but thousands of children have been represented. Not just hundreds-of-thousands, but tens-of-millions of dollars have been paid out in case settlements. [cite]

Now, as complicated and as difficult of an issue as that is, it’s made even more so if the patient is a minor. The object of overtreatment could be your child.

Children are probably not asked for their opinion when it comes to dental procedure. They are children, after all. In addition to being an adult, the dentist is supposed to be the authority on what needs to be done. He holds a position of trust. Why would a child question what’s happening? Why would a child ever consider that a dentist would take advantage?

And why would you, dear parent? Naturally, you believe what a dentist tells you your child needs! You want to do everything you can to take care of your children. And it’s this very vulnerability that makes overtreatment so terrible.

Here are some examples of dental overtreatment that have made the news:

  • Pulling eight teeth from a 6-year-old
  • Crowning 16 teeth of a 3-year-old
  • Using anesthesia on a 4-year-old on the autism spectrum, leading to his death
  • Strapping a child to a papoose board (the cross-shaped board with straps)
  • Overmedicating a 30-pound child, rendering her unresponsive and on a feeding tube

Understand that these are the most extreme cases of overtreatment that have gained attention. Unnecessary dental work won’t necessarily be that over-the-top. Obviously, overtreament doesn’t always lead to children’s death. But in some cases, it does. In many cases, it causes pain and trauma. In all cases, overtreatment is going to cost.

As a parent, you are rightly concerned for the oral health of your child. And now, you are rightly concerned for your child being treated properly at the dentist’s office. You want your child to have the best treatment that she needs. Not what will be most profitable for the dentist, not what will be billed to insurance, not the most aggressive approach to “possible problem areas” in the mouth. No, you want to make sure your child has dental treatment that is necessary.

The deeper question is: how can you know what dental work is unnecessary?

Here at the American Dental Foundation, you can learn more that will help you protect your children in the dentist’s chair.

Is your child being overtreated? Are you being told that your child needs an excessive amount of dental work? Come join the conversation with other like-minded parents at our Facebook page.

Why should you trust or listen to us? We are a unique and to our knowledge the only national children’s dental foundation of our kind. We are a 501(c)(3), a non-profit, run exclusively by the parents, for the benefit of the children. That means that all those motivations that lead some dentists to conduct unnecessary dental work will never enter the equation, here. Our desire is that you will be able to make informed, accurate decisions, for the good of your children.

For more valuable information, give us your best email address to receive free, no obligation videos to protect and care for your children. Go to (if you have not already) USACDF.info

Future Articles:

  • 2 Steps to Get Your Child Flossing
  • Ask the Dentist to Explain
  • Who Owns Your Pediatric Dentist?
  • Don’t Lie to the Dentist
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Respiratory Disease
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Heart Disease
  • Children’s dental disease connection with Osteoporosis
  • Mom’s dental disease connection with premature birth

If you have concerns, from how to find a dentist, how to know when to get a second opinion, how dental disease affects your children’s health, please submit a request via comment or email.

For submitting a suggestion, you’ll receive a free gift.

Share!